An Artist, Photographer, Writer, Poet

Tag Archives: aging


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A TIME TO SAY GOODBYE

The time has come,
after all my whining
about wanting quiet time,
an empty house,
no disruptions to my thoughts,
I remember being told,
“be careful what you wish
for…you MAY get it.”
.
The time has come
for the last to leave
and move away,
and not return
to stay.
MOVE,
not just go to school,
join the Air Force,
(you tricked me here,
but I understand,
better life choices
in Denver)
or out of the house but
still with in reach …
twenty miles is almost
next door.
.
When the time came,
Y’all took my advice,
move near an airport
to make visiting easy…
Denver and
Dallas airports seem
a world away.
Close but not so close.
.
The time has come for
the last “forever” move,
Sabrina,
on her own,
the first grandchild to be on
her own.
My house has been her “base”,
home away from home,
for almost 19 years.
.
The time has come
for all good things
to come to an end.
Good things will start
in Texas for Sabrina,
her new home,
new school of art,
near her mother,
sister,
John,
And I can’t forget
the CATS,
Baby and Kiki
who’ve been missed like
siblings.
.
The time has come,
a new day
is starting,
a new door opened,
a new chapter has
begun.
It’s a time to say
Goodbye.
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TPOS prompt: Drastic life event:
nursing home for rehab
Seaport Village Healthcare,
Ellsworth, Maine USA
…………….
.
.
thoughts of you
continue
wondering what
I’m missing
what you’re writing
and I’m not
.
first the puter
then the knee
then the puter again
sigh
but now is mended
along with knee
.
so long away…
seems like a year
and not a month
.
knee replacement
takes hard work
getting back up and going
one more knee to go
.
time flies
as one ages
places to go
things to do
.
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photo: (c) 2016 Sherpa
sunset in DownEast Maine
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Kathabela Wilson wrote for the prompt:

We all know that life is challenging, changeable full of the unexpected and difficult. 

How do we deal with this? 

We’ve seen animals adapting to loss, and incapacity,

 and we all have such examples in our own lives and those we love. 

What are the ways of coping, confronting the natural and unnatural forces of life, 

the mishaps and the tragedies?

What have you observed,

 felt, what tangible examples

 of dealing with life’s challenges 

can you express in your tanka? 

How have you done this yourself? 

Sometimes we can help each other,

 but ultimately it is our own task and 

we are prey to the weaknesses of chemistry, 

environment and life itself.

=================

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MY RESPONSE: (I am 70 as I write this)

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my mind says 

I’m in my twenties…

body says, “you wish’

mind says ok forty

body says get a walker

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I find it is true … what “elderly” people

told me when I worked in a nursing facility.

If they didn’t have what ever problem required

them to be in a nursing facility,

they felt usually in their 30’s mentally.

At 70, I find it difficult to believe that I cannot

do, have the stamina to do what I did when I was

in my twenties, thirties, even older.  

Siggi


Autumn Frost from blogsite

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Kristjaan writes:  

Today I love to share a, not so well known, haiku by (my master) Matsuo Basho

in which we can read and see how ancient Japanese honored their parents.

As they did honor their parents we see nowadays

more dis-honor for parents or likewise parents for their kids.

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te ni tora ba kie n namida zo atsuki aki no shimo
.
if taken into my hand
melting in the heat of tears
autumn frost
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© Matsuo Basho (1644-1694)
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As was common in those times this haiku had a preface:
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‘At the beginning of September I came back home.
I was already long since my mother had died. 
The grass in front of mother’s room had withered in the frost. 
Everything had changed. 
The hair of my brother and sisters 
(Basho had a brother, an elder sister and three younger sisters)
was white and they had wrinkles between their eyebrows. 
We could only say, ‘we are fortunate to be still alive’. 
Nothing more. 
My elder brother opened an amulet case and said reverently to me, 
‘Look, at mother’s white hair. 
You have came back after such a long time. 
 
So this is like the Tamate Box of Urashima Taro.
 
Your eyebrows have become white’. 
We wept for a while and then I composed this verse.
.
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yes I do sometimes write a preface to my haiku as was common in Basho’s time):
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 Chèvrefeuille preface
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This verse of Basho touches me deep, because it brings painful memories. My Grandparents are all gone and also my elder brother died. As I look into the mirror my hair is starting to become grey. When my brother was still alive he surely would be grey, because he was several years older.

 

life passes –

in the early sunlight

the ripe melts

 

frost on the branches

melts in the early sunlight

life passes

 

© Chèvrefeuille (2012)

 

my hair turned grey

as if it was the frost

on bare branches

 

a pebble

thrown into the old pond

in an eye blink it’s gone

 

© Chèvrefeuille (2012)

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My response preface:
.
In red to honor my mother who loved red to go with her
white blouses and black skirts. 
(Her  white pearls she wore often looked elegant with red.)
 
When my mother died, my 
father had already been gone for many years,
a baby sister died decades ago.
I became the matriarch
of my immediate small family:
a younger brother, (who became the patriarch when dad died)
two adult children who may be past their middle age,
and four granddaughters who are adults or nearly adults.
Time goes by so quickly…
in my mind, I feel as if I’m still in my thirties,
I look in the mirror, and it says otherwise.
.
.
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My response haiku… 
in baby blue to honor my father with the bluest eyes
.
my hair has gray frost
my eyes did too with cataracts
gram looked back in mirror
I see again with clarity
the miracle of medicine 
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.

 


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1962 High School Graduation photo…my mental mirror image
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mirror oh mirror

who’s that old lady
in the glass ?
She seems at home
… friendly too.
Cat with a 
white Chaplin ‘stache
by her side…
she who said
“never will I be
an old lady
surrounded
by cats”.
.
.
A strange person 
is looking out at me.
Short gray hair, 
no auburn curls in sight
Round and fluffy
not the younger slimmer
woman that used
to live here
back in the day
she left one day
and never
returned.
.
.
Cataracts now gone,
what a vision
of a stranger then,
a clearer vision
seen in the glass, 
mirror oh mirror…
of the stranger come 
to roost.
Can’t be ~ is be
a stranger in the house.
The eyes look the same
now…
the stranger is missing
her fashion rims 
of blue or purple
how can that be.
.
.
Sigh
mirror oh mirror,
the stranger in the glass
seems here to stay.
Don’t know when she
arrived, 
just all of a sudden
an old lady …
she tells me that middle
age is when you can 
multiply your age by two
and think you’ll still
survive.
.
.
The old lady in the glass
mirror oh mirror, 
says for me to forget
middle age…
it whizzed by unseen
in the mirror.
One hundred forty 
seems to be a bit
extreme
for a middle age 
to dream of.
Sigh
.
.
Big Sigh.
Old lady in the glass,
mirror oh mirror,
speaks with 
wisdom
beyond 
her 
thinking
of being
thirty five
in her 
heart of hearts
and 
soul of souls.
BIG SIGH
.
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September 22, 2012 at the Common Ground Fair
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YOU ARE AMONG TOADS

You are among toads
“Think as I think,” said a man,
“or you are abominably wicked; you are a toad.”
And after I thought of it,
I said, “I will, then, be a toad.” ~
Stephen Crane
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© Sigrid Saradunn 2013…Common Ground Fair, Children’s Area

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make a difference .
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so many choices ~ pick one
..
random acts ~ souls smile . .
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judgment is easy
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book by cover can deceive
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not all age with grace
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© 2013 Sigrid Saradunn… on a porch driving to East Blue Hill
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aging silent thief
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the body does ~ mind doesn’t
.
spirit says thirty

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***
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age an illusion
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body ages ~ spirit enriches
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wear seat belt ~ sunscreen

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